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Writing Your Perfect Man- Lessons from a Chick Lit Writer

I’ve written some dreamboats in my books, and the reason I started in the first place was because no man really seemed to be like the ones you read about in books. Which is fine, we live in reality, we don’t expect Prince Charming. But here’s a few things I’ve noticed about the dreamy male characters in books, and maybe they’ll give our real life counterparts some ideas.

 

 

  • They’re capable of explaining how they feel.

 

It’s usually way after something silly has happened, but these guys have enough self knowledge to explain why they’ve done something. That’s always nice, instead of sitting there in confusion, like a real person.

 

  • Some shit happened, but they’re over it.

 

There was a crazy ex, a business deal gone wrong, parental issues. We always meet our leading men at the right time, when they’re done with all that stuff and can move on. In real life, we meet people when we meet them, and we’re usually dealing with our own stuff too. Which is where the understanding that real people aren’t perfect comes in.

 

  • Organisation

 

I think people often mistake what power means. I personally didn’t find Christian Gray a decent male character, he didn’t make me swoon. Neither did that soppy vampire. People were attracted to their power over their women, and in Gray’s case, his money. It’s easy enough to say ‘Oh, he flew her about in a private jet’ or whatever, but the truth of power is the ability to arrange things. To book dinner, to make plans. Whether that’s a private jet, or a private booth at Burger King.

 

  • Surprises

 

Even control freaks like myself want a little surprise every now and then! My male leads are able to make sweet gestures that aren’t so over the top you want to vomit, but make a difference. Who doesn’t love a surprise?

 

  1. Understanding their girl.

 

Your dreamboat male knows what’s going on in his love’s head. Not always, that would be boring and unbelievable. But he knows enough about her history, her quirks, her story to figure out why she’s suddenly freaking out, or why she’s not happy. Understanding goes a long way.

 

  • They Give and Receive.

 

No, I’m not being dirty. A working relationship with a fictional dreamboat involves give and take. Your main man can’t come in and solve all her problems. Why, you ask? Because then she has no purpose. If she can’t offer something, if she’s not what he needs back, then there’s no point. Again, back to Fifty Shades of Shit, she’s poor, he’s rich, she’s innocent, he’s experienced. She likes nice things, and he likes beating the shit out of a willing sex partner. 

Also, I refuse to let my leading man sweep in to solve my leading lady’s problems- I write strong, kickass women who can save themselves. They sometimes need some help figuring out how to be vulnerable, but they don’t need a man on a white horse.

 

  • Faults

 

That leads me nicely to number seven- they have to have something wrong with them! You know how boring it is to be with someone perfect? Tends to give your self esteem a bit of a knock too. Whether he leaves biscuit crumbs in the bed, or has a tendency to flirt, he has to be human.

 

  • He sees her.

 

This is a really simple trope that real life men could learn from. Notice something about your partner and identify that you are paying attention. It could be as simple as Julia Stile’s ‘hey, your eyes have a little green in them’ in Ten Things I Hate About You. It could be Harry’s list of things he knows and loves about Sally in When Harry Met Sally (‘The little crinkle in your forehead when you’re looking at me like I’m nuts!’ Aw) but noticing goes a long way. It shows your male is smitten and your leading lady is worth watching.

 

 

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An Interview with a Character for #weloveromance

As part of the #WeLoveRomance Blog Tour, a group of us Carina authors are celebrating Valentines Day but presenting articles, short extracts, and yesterday, an interview with a character from our book. Unfortunately I was away from my computer yesterday, so here it is! Keep searching #weloveromance on twitter for more interviews!

 

Also, don’t forget to enter the competition to win a whole bunch of books from us! You can enter HERE.

 

An Interview With Harry Shulman, from The Last Word.

 

What do you think of Tabby Riley, your newest writer at The Type newspaper?

She’s, uh, well she’s certainly not like anyone else. Tabby is this really fine balance of genius and maniac. And I mean that in the best way. I headhunted Tabby, saw how well her blog was doing, how much her readers loved her, and I wanted that for our paper. I hadn’t quite imagined just how difficult she was going to be.

 

What do you mean by difficult?

Well, the majority of writers who work here just accept that I’m their editor. Tabby argues. A lot. But I actually really respect her for it. Sometimes she makes me want to punch myself in the face because I’m so frustrated, but she’s a great writer, she deserves a break. We just place value on different things.

 

What do you place value on then, Harry?

I like nice things, I don’t think there’s anything wrong with that. I worked hard to get my car, and wear nice suits and drink good wine. Tabby seems to think that anything above primark is the sign a shallow and money-driven personality. She still has a VCR player, for God’s sake! She refuses to let me choose places for our business lunches because she says I’m pretentious…I don’t see how wanting to take a woman for a nice lunch is a bad thing.

 

But these are business lunches?

Of course! We’ve managed to compromise and go to The Black Cat pub in town. Apparently I’m easily distracted when other females in the room. Which I think is completely unfair, just because women are nice to me, she takes that as not focussing. The woman drives me nuts, honestly. 

 

So you don’t see Tabby extending her contract beyond these few months at The Type?

It’s really up to my boss. And the stats of course. If Tabby’s column Miss Twisted Thinks keeps receiving great reviews and viewings, then it’s definitely a possibility. I’d really love her to stay. I think she’s a great addition to our team, and brings new life to the paper, even if it’s her tendency to write tangential pieces about different types of cake. 

 

And what about the rumours around The Type that you and Miss Riley have more than a working relationship, and spend a suspicious amount of time in the stationary cupboard?

I don’t know what you’re talking about. We’re colleagues, we’re friends, and if we’re in the stationary room we’re probably arguing over whether biro or rollerball pens are best. Okay, so maybe we’re a bit more affectionate with each other than I am with other staff members, but I have to be. If I’m going to go seventeen rounds of arguing over one article, at some point, I have to be comforting. That’s my job. 

 

So, driving her down to Brighton for the day, taking bottles of wine to her house, these are professional things to be doing?

Brighton was for a story! She doesn’t drive. I thought it would be easier. The wine was to apologise for being an arse. I don’t know why I’m justifying myself to you, even if me and Tabby were together, it would be completely legitimate. There’s nothing in the rules at the paper saying co-workers can’t date.

 

But, considering Miss Riley’s romantic involvement with her previous editor at The Guardian, don’t you think it’s a bit strange 

Ah, so that’s your angle is it? Sniffing about for dirt on good old Richard. I am not in a position to comment on Miss Riley’s previous relationships, and I am letting you know I’m answering no further questions. Tabby is a hard working and talented writer, and she’s got to where she is because of that, not because of any romantic entanglements. I’m done.